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February 14, 2024

Five Ways Non-Black People Can Celebrate Black History Month

Black History Month is the intentional time we set aside here in the United States to recount and recognize the sacrifices and contributions made by Black people throughout American history. It is also an intentional time to account for where Black America is today.

Systemic inequities and racial prejudice have long plagued society, particularly in the American context. From enslavement to Jim Crow and mass incarceration, there has never been a moment in the history of the United States of America wherein Black people weren't understood to be at the bottom of our implied social caste system.

That is why Black History Month is so important.

It calls us to celebrate the achievements and accomplishments of today and yesteryear while also mourning, championing, and honoring those who lost their lives in pursuit of racial justice and equity.

We all play a role in uplifting and celebrating Black History Month. Here are five ways non-Black people can celebrate and honor Black History Month. 

Photo from The March on Washington, Courtesy of Zinn Education Project

Photo from The March on Washington, Courtesy of Zinn Education Project

1.) Educate Yourself.

Learn about the historical accomplishments and triumphs of Black Americans and the significance of Black History Month. For instance, do you know why Black History Month is celebrated in February, or that, since 1976, every Black History Month has had its own unique theme? Exploring the history and legacy behind Black History Month is a great way to begin a journey of self-education and reflection.

Some books on Black History I’ve been reading that I’d recommend to you include: Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi, Reclaiming Our Space by Feminista Jones, and White Rage by Carol Anderson. Notable podcasts I’d highlight include “Intersectionality Matters” with Kimberle Crenshaw and "Throughline" from NPR. 

Nine Books by Black Women Authors; Courtesy of Forward Ladies

Nine Books by Black Women Authors; Courtesy of Forward Ladies

No matter how you consume new information, staying committed to occupying the learners’ seat is critical for inclusive individuals. Remember – knowledge is power. And “the biggest way people give up their power is by believing they don’t have any (Alice Walker).” 


2.) Support Black-Owned Businesses.

Consider supporting Black-owned businesses or Black-owned restaurants in your community or online. This can include purchasing products or services or sharing information about these businesses on social media.

Spending your money with Black-owned businesses during Black History Month is crucial, as it helps pay homage to the economic resilience of Black and African American people throughout our nation's history. By patronizing these businesses, you can contribute to economic empowerment, promote equity, and help bridge the racial wealth gap. 

Image Courtesy Mississippi Free Press

Image Courtesy Mississippi Free Press


3.) Donate to Organizations that Support Black Communities.

Many organizations work to support Black communities and fight against racial injustice. Consider donating to one of these organizations to show your support and extend the organization’s impact.

Donations as small as even $5 can add up – collectively, we can create change, one dollar at a time. 


4. Attend Local Black History Month Events

Numerous museums, community organizations, nonprofits, and even co4. Attend Local Black History Month Eventsrporations alike will put on events celebrating Black History Month. Attend events hosted by groups that give back to the Black community and enjoy a day of intercultural engagement and fellowship.

The highlight of my Black History Month so far was a collaborative event Raven Solomon Enterprises hosted with The Homage Exhibit, a traveling and virtual Black and African American history museum. If you were not at that event, check The Homage Exhibit out

Black History Month Parade, Atlanta, GA, 2023

Black History Month Parade, Atlanta, GA, 2023


5.) Volunteer with Organizations Supporting Black Communities.

Volunteering with nonprofit organizations that support Black and African American communities during Black History Month is essential to honor history, support community development, strengthen cultural awareness, and promote civic engagement. By volunteering, you can actively contribute to creating a more equitable and inclusive society. 

Happy Black History Month, from Raven Solomon Enterprises

Happy Black History Month, from Raven Solomon Enterprises


Something I say every February is that “Black people exist outside of Black History Month.” While we need non-Black allies and advocates to champion Black History Month visibly, we need them to do the same for Black communities all year long.

By championing diversity, equity, and inclusion, we continue the legacy of Black History Month. Always remember: Black history is American history. How will you carry on the legacy of those who paved the path for the advocacy of today? 

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Raven Solomon


Raven is a Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Speaker, Author, & Strategist who helps organizations understand generations, racial equity, and their intersection.

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